Tarantulas Caresheets Search

Custom Search

onsdag den 4. juni 2008

Handling Tips for Pet Chaco Tarantula

videoLearn how to handle a pet chaco golden knee tarantula in this free pet care video from our spider habitat authority
videoLearn how to care for a chaco golden knee tarantula in this free pet care video from our spider habitat authority

fredag den 25. april 2008

African Occellated Mantis (Pseudocreobroter occellata)


The African Occellated Mantis is a neat invertebrate pet. These colorful little mantids are easy to breed in captivity, therefore they are fairly common at the moment. They are between 25 and 40 nymphs per ootheca (eggcase). African Occellated Mantids have a look of their own, with a unique design on their wings, and a spiky appearance. They are pros when it comes to catching prey, and will catch a flying insect right out of the air! Like most mantids, the African Occellated Mantis should be kept well ventilated. A screen cage works best for this, just make sure the holes aren't too big for the live prey or baby mantis to escape through. Also, as with other mantid species, they need perches for molting, therefore, branches are necessary. They also need to be fed and misted every other day. Not a starter species, but you don't have to have much experience to keep this mantis. African Occellated Mantids make a good species for an "advanced beginner". In conclusion, the African Occellated Mantis is a nice and rewarding mantis to keep in captivity.

Range Savannahs and tropical forests of Africa.
Type Arboreal.
Diet Babies eat flightless fruit flies, pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, moths, flies, and other large insects.
Full Grown Size 2 to 3 inches.
Growth Fast speed.
Temperature 75 to 82° F.
Humidity 75 to 80%.
Temperament Docile and calm.
Housing For mantids, a screen cage is best, and is recommended more than any other enclosure. Babies can live in a small screen cage. Adults can live in a large screen cage. Height is more important than floor space.
Substrate 2 to 3 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.
Decor Branches, live plants, vines etc. make good climbing accessories. They also need these decorations to hang upside-down on a branch or a leaf for molting purposes. Moss can be added for floor cover.
Other Names Bulls-eye Mantis, and #9 Mantis.

Malaysian Orchid Mantis (Hymenopus coronatus)


Masters of disguise, the rare Malaysian Orchid Mantis is a gem of the insect world! The coloration between specimens varies from pink to yellow to white, allowing the Malaysian Orchid Mantis to blend in with orchid flowers in its' native habitat. This camouflage is good for not being seen by predators, or prey. Malaysian Orchid Mantids are great at catching prey, especially flying insects. The prey doesn't detect the mantis, until it's too late. Feeding a Malaysian Orchid Mantis can be quite a show! This rare species is slightly difficult to breed. With mature males sometimes less than half the size of the adult females, inbreeding is not likely. Molting can be problematic without proper humidity because of the mantids' extended legs. The legs of a Malaysian Orchid Mantis are made to look like the pedals of a flower. Lastly, the Malaysian Orchid Mantis is reputed to be one of the calmest and most docile mantis species out there! So if you're an intermediate keeper looking for a rare and unique mantis to add to your collection, the Malaysian Orchid Mantis is the one for you!

Range Malaysian rainforests, possibly rainforests in the Indonesian Islands.
Type Arboreal.
Diet Babies eat flightless fruit flies, pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, moths, flies, and other large insects.
Full Grown Size Females get up to 4.5 inches. Males get up to 2 inches.
Growth Fast speed.
Temperature Around 80° F.
Humidity Around 75%.
Temperament Docile and calm.
Housing For mantids, a screen cage is best, and is recommended more than any other enclosure. Babies can live in a small screen cage. Adults can live in a large screen cage. Height is more important than floor space.
Substrate 2 to 3 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.
Decor Branches, live plants, vines etc. make good climbing accessories. They also need these decorations to hang upside-down on a branch or a leaf for molting purposes. Moss can be added for floor cover.
Other Names Pink Orchid Mantis.

Malaysian Dead Leaf Mantis (Deroplatys dessicata)


The Malaysian Dead Leaf Mantis is a mysterious mantis species. The females of this species can get huge, yet they still are hard to spot out in the rainforest. Malaysian Dead Leaf Mantids hold true to their name. Not only do the legs resemble leaves and twigs, but the entire top of the body has the facade of a dead leaf! The dark underside of the mantis is also good for camouflage, if you look up, you will just see a leaf shadow. The Malaysian Dead Leaf Mantis is master in its' micro-domain, quietly slaying its' unsuspecting insect prey. These mantids are generally placid, but they have a daunting threat display. The Malaysian Dead Leaf Mantis rears back, with his head up high, and ready to strike. Like with cobras, the hooded head adds to the fearsome demeanor. The Malaysian Dead Leaf Mantis makes a cryptic pet for the insect keeper.

Range Malaysian rainforests.
Type Arboreal.
Diet Babies eat flightless fruit flies, pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, moths, flies, and other large insects.
Full Grown Size Females get up to 5.5 inches. Males get up to 3 inches.
Growth Fast speed.
Temperature 75 to 80° F.
Humidity Around 75%.
Temperament Docile and calm.
Housing For mantids, a screen cage is best, and is recommended more than any other enclosure. Babies can live in a small screen cage. Adults can live in a large screen cage. Height is more important than floor space.
Substrate 2 to 3 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.
Decor Branches, live plants, vines etc. make good climbing accessories. They also need these decorations to hang upside-down on a branch or a leaf for molting purposes. Moss can be added for floor cover.
Other Names Dead Leaf Mantis.

Grants' Rhinoceros Beetle (Dynastes granti)


Grants' Rhinoceros Beetle is the longest of the US rhinoceros beetles with the record specimen at 85mm (3.25 inches)! It is a very impressive beetle with a heavy build. Females resemble monstrous spotted June beetles while the males look much more exotic and possess a horn on both the pronotum and head. The horns of the male are used in fighting over females and food. Smaller males can have very tiny horns although properly feeding larvae will produce all major males, like the captive-bred males pictured to the left. In the wild, Grants' Rhinoceros Beetles can be found out at night feeding on tree sap. In captivity, maintaining these beetles is much easier. Unlike many other invertebrates, Grants' Rhinoceros Beetles don't seem to get stressed out by being handled and gently played with by people. They also do not pose a threat to humans when bites and stings are concerned, therefore, these giant beetles make excellent pets! The Grants' Rhinoceros Beetle only lives for one or two years, but it's still an invertebrate worth keeping. They have been becoming more popular lately, and it is easy to see why. The Grants' Rhinoceros Beetle is a perfect combination of simple care, good temperament, and large size.

Range United States, Arizona and bordering states.
Type Terrestrial.
Diet Larvae feed on decomposing rotten wood and leaves. Adults will eat real maple syrup and the soft parts of numerous fruits in captivity.
Full Grown Size 1.2 to 3.25 inches.
Growth Fast speed.
Temperature 60 to 75° F.
Humidity 70 to 75%.
Temperament Night active adults seem calm during the day but are quite energetic in the late evening. Males need little incentive to fight but seldom cause more than superficial damage to one another. Adults are strong flyers but poor at landing.
Housing Larvae should be kept in glass containers with air holes. Adults should be kept in well sealed glass or plastic containers with air holes. Floor space is as important as height.
Substrate 4 to 6 inches of the soil mentioned in the "Diet" section.
Decor Logs, driftwood, cork bark, etc. make good climbing accessories.
Other Names Giant North American Rhinoceros Beetle, White Beetle, and Western Hercules Beetle.

Madagascar Hissing Cockroach (Gromphadorhina portentosa)


Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches are large, wingless, live-bearing cockroaches that may be the best starter cockroach species. They're relatively common, inexpensive, and very interesting additions to any collection, as well as great food items for reptiles, large tarantulas, and large centipedes. Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches have a tough exoskeleton for protection, for they do not possess wings like many other cockroach species. They can also produce a loud hissing sound to scare away predators. Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches generally live 2 to 3 years as adults, but some adults can live for up to 5 years. They can be raised in large numbers in a matter of months, yet are not a pest species. Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches have been used as creepy effects in movies for many years as well. The Madagascar Hissing Cockroach makes an amazing, exotic, and easy-to-care for insect pet!

Range Moist forests of Madagascar.
Type Terrestrial.
Diet Babies and adults eat romaine lettuce, red leaf lettuce, apples, carrots, and other fruits and vegetables.
Full Grown Size 1.5 to 3 inches.
Growth Fast speed.
Temperature 75 to 90° F.
Humidity 75 to 80%.
Temperament Docile and calm.
Housing Babies can live in a clear plastic container with air holes. Adults can live in a 2.5 to 15-gallon tank, depending on the number of cockroaches. Cockroaches can live communally. Floor space is more important than height.
Substrate 1 to 2 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.
Decor Cork bark, live plants, driftwood, etc. make good hiding places.
Other Names Madagascar Giant Hissing Cockroach.